Click Here for The Online News Station

 

Brenda's  Garden
by Brenda Beust Smith
(THE HOUSTON CHRONICLE’S LAZY GARDENER)

December 25, 2005
 

Photos by Brenda Beust Smith

 


The most noteworthy thing about gardeners is that they are always optimistic, always enterprising, and never satisfied. They always look forward to doing something better than they have ever done before. - Vita Sackville-West, 1892 - 1962

 
DEAR BRENDA: I live in Dickinson and love propagating plants, but I'm not very good at it. Are there any classes I could attend on this? MM

DEAR MM: There's a huge series coming up that would be perfect for you. You don't have to live in Harris County to attend. It's the Friday, January 13 Plant Propagation Workshop sponsored by Harris County Master Gardeners Precinct 2 at the Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive, Houston 77004. Session 1: Seeds & Spores -- 9am – 1pm, Wednesday, January 18, 2006. Session 2: Cuttings, Stems & Leaf -- 9am – 1pm, Wednesday, January 25, 2006. Session 3: Grafting & Layering -- 9am – 1pm, Wednesday, February 15, 2006.

These workshops are designed for the serious home gardener, garden club member, community garden leader, teacher, master gardener, or hobby propagator, taking the student one step beyond the basics of propagation and into intermediate techniques and tricks of the trade.  Each class will include a lecture followed by hands-on practice. Descriptive handouts and all materials will be included.  All students will take home a rich selection of newly propagated materials.  These workshops can be taken as a series or individually. Workshop size is limited.  Please register early. Questions? Call 281.991.8437 or log onto our website at http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.  Session 1: ($ 35.00) Registration deadline, Friday, January 13, 2006. Session 2: ($ 35.00) Registration deadline, Friday, January 20, 2006. Session 3: ($ 35.00) Registration deadline, Friday, February 10, 2006. All: ($100.00).

You might check the calendar below for other programs.  I update this master calendar with every column I send in.

Another great workshop coming up will be closer to you: Thursday (Jan. 12): Registration deadline for Jan. 14 “Gardening by the Square Foot” by John Jons, 9-11 a.m., Galveston County Extension Office, 5115 Highway 3 in Dickinson.  Galveston County Master Gardener event, 281-534-3413 Ext. 6, or http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm;  free.

• • •

Every year I do a random survey of readers and retailers to see what they considered the WOW plants of that year. The plants have to be VERY low maintenance, but that's the only criteria. No pampered plants allowed! Here are some of my responses. Consider these plants for your own garden:

CINDY APPLEMAN, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENER AND COORDINATOR OF THE “A CHILD'S GARDEN” AT THE BEAR CREEK EXTENSION OFFICE: My Butterfly Vine (Mascagnia
macroptera) has looked great all year and particularly now with a profusion of chartreus butterfly seed pods.

This is its second year in the ground and it proved quite drought tolerant because it's not irrigated and only received sporadic watering. It's growing on an embedded pole that used to support a basketball net. I wrapped it with chicken wire and let the butterfly vine do its magic.

A dubious success was Australian Violet (Viola hederacea). It was too successful as a shade ground cover under my dwarf azaleas once it started to engulf them! However it was a fabulous green, has adorable flowers, it spreads exuberantly and it bounces back from heat stroke quite well. If I had had regular azaleas, its growth pattern would have been fine since it did a great job helping to insulate the shallow root system of azaleas.

VERENA AESCHBACHER, BLUEBONNET MASTER GARDENER: We live outside of Houston and have quite heavy clay soil, which I had improved in my garden. One of the easiest and most prolific vegetables are sweet potatoes. In February I let a storebought sweet potato root in some water; in May it had grown some leaves and I planted it in a garden bed, fertilized with compost and cotton seed meal.  A beautiful wine grew to cover large areas during the hot summer time, and by September the first sweet potatoes were ready to be digged up. They taste great, are very healthy and from that one potatoe, we could dig about 2 bushels of new ones! They grow close to the surface and are easier to dig then white potatoes. A true Lazy Gardeners dream!

Persimmons are wonderful to grow, look beautiful at this time of the year and are vertually pest free. They require little care, except some watering during this very dry summer. The Chronicle featured recently some great recipes and we like a persimmon chutney. The seedlings were given to me and it is unclear which variety they are, but one looks like japanese persimmons - whatever we enjoy the beauty of the trees, the fruit and the ease of care!

PHOEBE AT THE ARBOR GATE (TOMBALL): 1. Henry Duelberg Salvia-blooms from spring through fall and is still spectacular in our gardens and it's November!  If it gets too huge you can cut it back at any time, it hesitates for a nanno second and is blooming again before you know it.

2. Almond Verbena-Doesn't look like much in the pots, but in the garden-WOW!  It grows really, really fast and the fragrance just about knocks you over!  Absolutely no disease or insect problems! Large shrub or small ornamental tree.

 
MARY BETH MCCAUGHEY, SUGAR LAND GARDEN CLUB: I particularly enjoyed my Red Rocket Russellia this year.

It is a favorite of hummingbirds and it's upright growth habit with a graceful, spreading base makes it a beautiful accent near my deck. Being a perennial, it requires little care (a big plus with my schedule!). I also have White Swan Coneflowers and Yellow Turnera in that bed so butterflies are also frequent visitors.

JOHN FERGUSON, NATURE'S WAY RESOURCES (CONROE): My favorite is: "Podranea ricaselina" - known as 'Desert Trumpet Vine' or 'Desert Crossvine', mine is 15 years old now and is beautiful and in full bloom. It starts blooming in May when it gets warm and has not stopped reaching its peak right now. It thrives on heat, drought and poor soil. Each flower is about 1.25" long by 1/2" wide and appear in clusters, they are thousands of them now. It will grow 20 feet in a season and roots easily from the vines. Many bees, insects, butterflies and hummingbirds enjoy the flowers.

MIKE SHOUP, ANTIQUE ROSE EMPORIUM: I like "Engelmann's Quest", one of our new Pioneer Roses that looks like yellow wildflowers (Daisies)when in bloom. The plants are cascading bushes to three feet. It blooms spring and fall.

NANCY GREIG, COCKRELL BUTTERFLY CENTER; Bauhinia mexicana. Blooms non-stop, and is a great favorite of swallowtail butterflies in particular. Is also visited by carpenter bees, and occasionally, hummingbirds. Doesn't get too big, has a nice, pleasing, full shape.

PATRICK HUDNALL, TEXAS GULF COAST FERN SOCIETY: The Formosa Lily has proven a top performer for me over the past few years. I was unfamiliar with this plant when I bought it at the Bulb Mart four years ago. After bringing it home I read up on it, but remained skeptical about its expected performance since we are out of the zone for most Asiatic lilies. That fall I planted the 4" starter plant in a 12" pot. By spring time I had lost track of the identification tag and the foliage had long since withered. I had no idea what was coming up in this particular pot, mixed with a couple dozen derelict pots of soil. By mid summer a good sized plant had emerged which soon was covered with an abundance of fragrant, trumpet shaped flowers, much like Easter Lilies. The Formosa Lily has been free from attack by insects or disease only needing sun, average water and good drainage.

HEIDI SHEESLEY, TREESEARCH FARMS: ‘David Verity’ cuphea.

MARY ELLEN BEAUPRE, GALVESTON COUNTY PLANT SWAP ORGANIZER: Best Plants that did great for me: Thunbergia "Blue Sky Flower Vine", Passiflora "Purple Passion Flower Vine", Butterfly Vine, Dutchman's Pipe Vine, Clematis Vine, Old Garden Roses "Mslle. Franciska Kruger, Dutchess de Brabant, Dame de Cour, Mutabilis", Red Passion Flower Vine, Butterfly Bush, "Purple Knight", Esperanza, A maranthus, Coral Vine, Carolina Jassmine Vine, Variegated Hibiscus, Ageratum, Texas Star Hibuscus, Lord and Lady Baltimore, Hardy Hibiscus and as always, Cosmos and Zinnias.

GAYE HAMMOND, HOUSTON ROSE SOCIETY: Best roses of the year: Mutabilis (Named Rose of the Year for 2004 by Texas A&M University); Veterans Honor (Hybrid Tea). Favored perennials: Ixora Maui Flame (shrub with bright orange bloom heads); Persian Shield (royal purple foliage with indigo blue veins); Rangoon Creeper (vine with sweet honey fragrance and pink, rose and white blooms).

EDDIE HOLEK, COCKRELL BUTTERFLY CENTER: Bauhinia mexicana did great this year. Held up great in a pot through the late summer drought. It is great for hummingbirds and butterflies.  I think it is one of our most important plants out there for habitat gardens. Thunbergia mysorensis finally bloomed in my yard this year.  It is such a beautiful bloom.
Cassia splendida (The one from Monrovia), it has been blooming non-stop since July. There is one called buttercream that is nice also.
 

JERRY SEYMORE, JERRY'S JUNGLE GARDENS: I found this spectacular new plant this year, I don't get very excited offen, but Sesbania grandiflora is really a traffic stopper. The tree its self isn't much, but when it blooms, it looks like a Christmas tree, ornaments hanging from the branches. Red, pink and white, on separate trees, darn it, if I could graft the different colors on to one tree, WOW! Don't know how cold hardy it is yet, but it is tropical. I had a few of the pink variety at my sale, blooming, people nearly came to fistacuffs over them, lasted about 3 minutes, all gone. I'm hoping to have more for the Summer sale 06, we'll know if they can take our cool weather.

PAT MITROWSKI, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS PRECINCT 2: My favorites this year have been my Rangoon Creeper (Quisqualis indica) and Chinese Hat (Holmskioldia tettensis).

They have bloomed non stop all summer long! 

 

Another great one has been Climing Pinkie, it was absolutely gorgeous this spring.

GEORGE AND MARAJANE JONES, WINDSOR HILLS GARDEN CLUB (THE WOODLANDS):
Brunfelsia ("Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow") was our favorite plant. We have 4 located in filtered shade, with well drained soil and plenty of moisture. These plants were great, this spring and they survived the heat and water restrictions of the Woodlands during June. We look forward to their blooming season of next year.

MARGARETTE JONES, FLOWER SHOW JUDGES AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS, BOTANIC GARDENS OF HOUSTON (NOT YET OPENED): A shrub (sometimes grown as a tree) is Clerodendrum variegated. The foliage is yellow/green with the underside a deep maroon.
Flowers pink in a big ball of smaller clusters of flowers. The heat got to it on one side, but I cut back and it put out a lot of new growth. I also have the all green one, but it has not flowered. It was grown from a cutting.

LINDA CRUM, MONTGOMERY COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS: My fall-blooming asters have never done so well - must be the cool weather.

DIANA CABINESS, CABINESS NATIVE PLANTS AND LANDSCAPING (Montgomery): #1-the native Turk's cap. wherever I put the red Turks cap did well. ..feeding the hummingbirds for hours at a time. And there were water restrictions in The woodlands...for the most part twice a week, 15 min each time. It thrived ,#2 along with Wedelia hispida (a native
perennial, not the invasive groundcover), honeybeeslove it. These 2 never missed
a beat even though they were newly planted.
ODETTE MCMURRAY, GARDEN CLUB OF HOUSTON: My Garden has been full of bloom for months with Senecio confusis and Antigonon (coral vine....the brightest darkest pink one)along a driveway fence.

The vines didn't bloom at the same, but alternated, which is probably a good thing since orange and pink together is eyepopping! Odette McMurrey

MARY VERSFELT, HERB SOCIETY OF AMERICA, SOUTH TEXAS UNIT: After this very difficult summer and fall 05 growing season, I still find Esperanza, (Yellow Bells) a winner. Despite the very hot and minimal rain in the Champions, FM 1960 Area, old tried and true never wilted, and put forth many cheerful yellow flowers. My thymes etc that had made the summer just gave up the ghost after Rita. That extremely hot period, no rain just put finish to many things. The begonia plants in a high shade area, pulled through although looked mightly stressed until the cool period arrived. Hope springs eternal and we are planting color, herbs and lettuces in anticipation of Houston's lovely winter gardening season.

CARLETTA M. KEITH, FORT BEND PLANT SWAP: One of the top performers for me is centratherum, a/k/a Brazilian Buttons. Nothing spectacular but very reliable, withstands dry weather and floods.

RAY SHER, URBAN HARVEST: I had never planted zinnias before this year and what a surprise I had. I planted a couple of varieties, and by far Benary's Giant Mix far outperformed my expectations. This mix provided a spectacular array of color with 5" to 6" heads on long stems that just kept coming and coming as long as I cut them or dead-headed them. I started with seed in mid April and a wonderful abundance of flowers until two weeks ago when I pulled them out to plant lettuces. I highly recommend this mix.

MILLIE BURRELL, TEXAS A&M DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY: My favorite plant of 2005 is Tricyrtis hirta 'Samurai'. You never know if toad lilies will survive and die wishing to live in California. But Samurai not only survived but is still blooming after 3 months. It thrived in dry shade for me. The variegation on the leaves is just a lovely bonus.

ANGELA CHANDLER, HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS: Marie van Houtte rose is amazing. This rose has been in my garden for over 8 years. It never gets sprayed, never. It seldom gets fed, never gets pruned, and seldom gets supplemental water. I think it may have been watered once this summer. Even with all this inattention, it is a large, healthy shrub that maintains its' foliage top to bottom, no bare legs. It has wonderful flushes of yellow blossoms tinged with pink off and on all year. I think this one is tougher than Belinda's Dream, and may deserve Texas Superstar status.

For fruit, I think it is hard to beat Tropic Snow peach. This fruit is simply melt-in-your-mouth delicious. It sets a good crop, spray program or no spray program. The fruit is pretty, and the taste is just amazing.

 
I have decided that every garden needs yellow cestrum.

Hummingbirds by day, hummingbird moths in the evening. I just love those silly moths. Some of them are prettier than hummingbirds, although I am sure that is some sort of blasphemy to hummer-lovers, so don't quote me or I'll have to hide for my life when we fish in Rockport! I have two plants in my garden that attract them, the brugmansias and the yellow cestrum. Pretty plant pruned as a small tree, too.
The gingers continue to tempt me.

I have been happy with every one I have added, but I add them slowly.

The kaempherias are just lovely. I will be digging out a ton of aspidistra this winter to make room for more.

Ipheon is fast becoming a favorite. I tried 6 or 7 between some pots on a walkway a few years ago, and they just keep getting better every year. I am trying to comeup with a way to combine ipheon with rainlilies to have a blooming walkway all year. Of course, I could go on, but then again, I just love plants.
 
BECKY LEUGEMORS, FORT BEND COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS AND THE ENCHANTED FOREST NURSERY: Plumbago - blue, plant the 3 gal. - takes too long to establish if small-likes drier soils-great against an arch, even- my best one is in sandy soil under an 8yr old pine tree. But we are all familiar with this one...

Bauhinia galpinii - pumpkin orange, protected somewhat (but the one at the forest isn't and has been fine) -large bush, spreading sideways, 5-6', lovely graceful shape, much as might be seen in a Japanese garden- heavy bloom, in cycles, sun, loose soils.

Jatropha-(J. integerrima?) - supposed to reach 20'h x12'w, but mine freezes back some and I cut it sometimes too - for a bush shape about 5-6'h x3-4'w- bright red-constant bloom all summer and tries to bloom in the winter too sometimes - mine is unprotected - rarely freezes far back - comes right back out - stays put, doesn't try to take over- not 'stoloniferous' as Heidi would say, but I did have a seedling one year. Butterflies like it pretty much (not as much as the dark purple Duranta!). It will propagate from cuttings I bring into the house for cut flowers and the pretty leaves! They are the longest-lasting of all my cut flowers (I guess because they are rooting).
 
Thryallis (or Thyrallis - take your pick-I've seen it in print both ways, but would probably go with whatever Heidi Sheesley says..if I could remember what she said....) This one is a great all-time bloomer, gets big (6'h x 6'w - mine this year) if not frozen or cut back.

Little yellow blooms all over, on spikes. Leaves are burgundy in winter, unless protected more, then green still.  Not as thick in winter.

New Dwarf Caesalpinia Pride of Barbados - Brilliant flame-colored one, but it began blooming at knee-high! It has put out several side-shoots that bloom shorter also. This is a new one for us-we are testing it for the CEMAP(Tx Superstars Program for Tx A&M). It has so far (since Mar. 05) been absolutely disease and insect free (we can't spray either), blooming very heavily, and is still almost waist high. I'm impressed and want this one, but perhaps it isn't out yet on the market.

New Pink Flare Mallow Hibiscus - Huge dark pink blooms - lots of them, started blooming at 2', hasn't yet gotten tall, in fact, it has started getting more full as fall approached. We are testing this one also since Mar. for the CEMAP program, and it probably isn't on market yet, but I am liking it a lot and will buy it when available.

Ladybird Dwarf Yellow Cosmos - I have put in this one for two summers, and it is a good one - comes back from seed well during the same summer, lemon yellow, and short still too. Under knee-high, and fat. I got the seeds from Wildseed Farms. They give good amounts of seeds in their $1 pkg, and send them to the house quickly. That reminds me, it is a good time to put out most seeds that will bloom in spring and need some cool weather first. I'd better get my order out there - should have done it already, a month or so ago. See ya at the Master Gardener (Ft. Bend) talk on the 17th (thur). Bye, Becky Leugemors


EMAIL GARDENING QUESTIONS TO BRENDA AT: brenda@guidrynews.com.  (Be sure to tell me where you live!)

***

GREATER HOUSTON/GALVESTON/BEAUMONT GARDENING CALENDAR (If your event that is not listed, it was not sent to me in time. I update the calendar with every new column. Send gardening event notices to Brenda at brenda@guidrynews.com.  Events submitted to this column may also appear in the Houston Chronicle Garden Calendar if space permits. These are pretty much printed as submitted.)

Monday (Jan. 9): “Organic Gardening” by Bart Brechter, 7 p.m., Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, 2929 Woodland Hills in Kingwood. Lake Houston Gardeners event, 832-368-9870.

Tuesday (Jan. 10): “Texas Super Stars” by Carol Brouwer, Ph.D., Master Gardener, Horticulture agent coordinator, Harris County Extension Service, 9:30 a.m., Jersey Village Civic Center, 16327 Lakeview Drive. Jersey Village Garden Club event, 713-466-6885; $5.

Tuesday, January 10th, "How to Best Grow Camellias in Houston" by Hal Vanis--a Henderson, Texas Camellia Nurseryman. 7:30 P.M. at St. Luke's Methodist Church, 3471 Westheimer, Room B151. A Houston Camellia Society meeting. Visitors welcome and free to the public. Call Greg Davis --713-781-1996 for further details.

Wednesday (Jan. 11): “Sandhill Cranes” by George Regmund, stewardship biologist with Armand Bayou Nature Center,10 a.m. Amegy Bank of Texas, 303 East Main St. in League City. League City Garden Club event, 281-535-0999; free.

Friday (Jan. 13): Plant Propagation Workshop Precinct 2 Harris County Master Gardeners Plant Propagation Workshop Series Intermediate Proficiency Level, Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive, Houston 77004. Session 1: Seeds & Spores -- 9am – 1pm, Wednesday, January 18, 2006. Session 2: Cuttings, Stems & Leaf -- 9am – 1pm, Wednesday, January 25, 2006. Session 3: Grafting & Layering -- 9am – 1pm, Wednesday, February 15, 2006. TCall 281.991.8437 or log onto our website at http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.  Session 1: ($ 35.00) Registration deadline, Friday, January 13, 2006. Session 2: ($ 35.00) Registration deadline, Friday, January 20, 2006. Session 3: ($ 35.00) Registration deadline, Friday, February 10, 2006. All: ($ 100.00)

Jan. 13th registration deadline for Propagation Workshop Series, Session I, to be held 9 a.m.-1 p.m. January 18, Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive.  Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardener Event, 281-991-8437 or http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu;  $35 per session (session 2 & 3 Jan. 25 and Feb. 15) or $100 for all three sessions.

Tuesday (Jan. 17): The Growing and Identification of Camellias by E. Gregory Davis, 7:00 p.m., Burgess Recreation Center, 4200 Kalwick in Deer Park. Deer Park Petal Pushers Garden Club meeting, 281-542-9731; free.

Wednesday (Jan. 18): Favorite Plants of the Lazy Gardener” by Brenda Beust
Smith: Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Dr, 713-524-5876 ext 332; www.hermannpark.org;  $7.

Thursday, Jan. 19: "Fruits & Vegetables," by Jeff McMullan and Susan Brodmerkel, 7-9 p.m., U of H Cinco Ranch, 4242 S. Mason Rd., Rm. 118. Green Thumb Seminar, 281.341.7068 or www.fbmg.com;  free.

Thursday, Jan. 19: “The $32 Million Enhancement and Restoration of Hermann Park” by Laurie Olin, 9:30 a.m., IMAX Theatre, Museum of Natural Science, One Hermann Circle Drive. Sadie Gwin Blackburn Environmental Lecture, River Oaks Garen Club event, 713-523-2483, or www.riveroaksgardenclub.org;  free.

Thursday, January 19: Registration deadline for Saturday, January 21 program Spring Vegetable Gardening, by MG Luke Stripling, 9-Noon, Galveston County Extension Office, 5115 Highway 3, Dickinson, 281-534-3413 Ext. 6, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm;  no fee but pre-registration is required. Sponsored by Galveston County Master Gardener Association.

Friday (Jan. 20): Registration deadline for Jan. 25 Propagation Workshop, 9
a.m.-1 p.m., Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive. Harris County Precinct
2 Master Gardener Event, 281-991-8437 or http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu;  $35.

Thursday, January 26: Registration deadline for Saturday, January 28 seminar Growing Peaches & Plums, by MG Herman Auer, 9-Noon, Galveston County Extension Office, 5115 Highway 3, Dickinson, 281-534-3413 Ext. 6, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm;  no fee but pre-registration is required.
Sponsored by Galveston County Master Gardener Association.

Saturday, February 4: 2006 Fruit Tree Seminar & Sale, Seminar by Heidi Sheesley of TreeSearch Farms at 8 a.m., Sale gates open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wayne Johnson Community Center at Carbide Park, 4102 FM 519, La Marque, 281-534-3413 Ext. 6, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm;  admission free. Sponsored by Galveston County Master Gardener Association.

Wednesday (Feb. 8): “Gardening by the Phases of the Moon” by Galveston County Master Gardener Jackie Reeves,10 a.m. Amegy Bank of Texas, 303 East Main St.
in League City. League City Garden Club event, 281-535-0999; free.

Thursday, Feb. 9, "Plant Propagation," by Jeff McMullan, 7-9 pm, U of H Cinco Ranch, 4242 S. Mason Rd., Rm. 118, Green Thumb Seminar, 281.341.7068 or www.fbmg.com;  free.

Thursday, February 9: Registration deadline for Saturday, February 11 program The Secrets of Growing Tomatoes, by MG Sam Scarcella, 9-Noon, Galveston County Extension Office, 5115 Highway 3, Dickinson, 281-534-3413 Ext. 6, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm;  no fee but pre-registration is required. Sponsored by Galveston County Master Gardener Association.

Friday (Feb. 10): Registration deadline for Feb. 15 Propagation Workshop, 9
a.m.-1 p.m., Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive. Harris County Precinct
2 Master Gardener Event, 281-991-8437 or http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu;  $35.

Friday, Feb. 11: Reservation Deadline Feb. 11 " Fruit Tree Funshop" by Tom LeRoy, Montgomery County Extension Svc., 10 a.m., Spring Nursery & Landscape,
25252 FM 2978, Tomball; No Charge, Free Refreshments and Door Prizes. Register at 281-357-1800.

Saturday (Feb. 11): Fort Bend County Fruit Tree Sale, time to be determined, Bud O'Shieles Community Center, 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg; free. Fort Bend Master Gardeners event, 281-341-7068 or http://fbmg.com;  free.

Wednesday (Feb. 15): "Topic pending" by Mark Bowen: Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Dr.; 713-524-5876 ext 332; www.hermannpark.org.; $7

Thursday, February 16: Registration deadline for Saturday, February 18 seminar An Introduction to Growing Roses, by MG John Jons, 9-Noon, Galveston County Extension Office, 5115 Highway 3, Dickinson, 281-534-3413 Ext. 6, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm;  no fee but pre-registration is required. Sponsored by Galveston County Master Gardener Association.

Saturday (Feb. 18): “Pocket Gardens — Trend of the Future” by John Floyd, Editor, Southern Living Magazine, University of Houston; free. Limited space; reservations required. For invitation, email your name and address to UHFebruaryEvent@aol.com; free.

Tuesday (Feb. 21): How to Create the Back Yard of Your Dreams, landscape design by Mr. and Mrs. Bob Beyer, 7:00 p.m., Burgess Recreation Center, 4200 Kalwick in Deer Park, Free. Deer Park Petal Pushers Garden Club meeting, 281-542-9731.

Thursday, March 2: Registration deadline for Saturday, March 4 program A Garden for Butterflies, by MG Anna Wygrys, 9-11 a.m., Galveston County Extension Office, 5115 Highway 3, Dickinson, 281-534-3413 Ext. 6, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm;  no fee but pre-registration is required.
Sponsored by Galveston County Master Gardener Association.

Saturday-Sunday (March 4-5): Spring Branch African Violet Club Show & Sale,
noon-4 p.m., Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Dr., 713-462-4257, www.orgsites.com/bx/sbavc;  free.

Wednesday (Mar. 8): “Planning for Cottage Garden Sale” with sale co-chairmen Judy Huber and Mary Frederick. 10 a.m. Amegy Bank of Texas, 303 East Main St.
in League City. League City Garden Club event, 281-535-0999; free.

Saturday (Mar. 18): Fort Bend County Perennial Sale, time to be determined, Bud O'Shieles Community Center, 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. Fort Bend Master Gardeners event, 281-341-7068 or http://fbmg.com;  free.

Tuesday (Mar 21): “What's New in Fertilizers” by Bob Patterson and Brian Boy with Southwest Fertilizer, 7:00 p.m., Burgess Recreation Center, 4200 Kalwick in Deer Park. Deer Park Petal Pushers Garden Club meeting, 281-542-9731; free.

Thursday, March 30: Registration deadline for Saturday, April 1 workshop Plant Propagation 101, by MG Propagation Team, 9-Noon, Galveston County Extension Office, 5115 Highway 3, Dickinson, 281-534-3413 Ext. 6, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm;  no fee but pre-registration is required.
Sponsored by Galveston County Master Gardener Association.

Tuesday (April 4): A Garden Club of America Small Flower Show. Presented by the 18 Clubs of The Garden Club of America Zone IX (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, & Texas), The Omni Hotel, Four Riverway in Houston. 713-871-8181

Thursday, April 6: Registration deadline for Saturday, April 8 workshop Grafting Fruit & Nut Trees, by MG Propagation Team, 9-Noon, Galveston County Extension Office, 5115 Highway 3, Dickinson, 281-534-3413 Ext. 6, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm;  no fee but pre-registration is required.
Sponsored by Galveston County Master Gardener Association

Tuesday (Apr 18): “A Showing of Many New and Heirloom Plants” by Scott Reeves with Treesearch Farms, 7:00 p.m., Burgess Recreation Center, 4200 Kalwick in Deer Park. Deer Park Petal Pushers Garden Club meeting, 281-542-9731; free.

Saturday (Apr. 22): Garden Gala Day, 9 a.m.- 2 p.m., Mast Arboretum, Stephen F. Austin State University, Intramural Fields on Wilson Road in Nacogdoches, 936-468-1832; free. Unusual, Texas-tough plants at great prices.

Friday-Sunday (May 5-7): Orchid Flower & Plant Extravaganza, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
May 5-6, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. May 7, George R. Brown Convention Center, 1001 Avenida De Las Americas, Houston Orchid Society event, 281-286-1471; $7.50.

Sunday (May 7): Daylily Festival, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Payne's in the Grass Daylily Farm, 2137 Melanie Lane, Pearland, 281-485-3821, www.paynesinthegrassdaylilyfarm.com; free

Friday-Saturday (July 1-2): “Celebrate the Jungle,” 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Jerry’s Jungle Tropical Gardens, 712 Hill Road, 281-272-8612 or www.jerrysjungle.com;  free.

Thursday-Saturday (Oct. 12-13-14): 2006 Bulb and Plant Mart. Garden Club of Houston, gchouston.org.


IF YOU ENJOY BRENDA'S COLUMNS, YOU'LL LOVE HER GARDENING BOOKS — available
online at www.urbanharvest.com.

FROM THE LAZY GARDENER •

• “The Lazy Gardener's Guide” — revised and updated! First published 10 years ago, The Guide is described by Brenda as “a gardening book in calendar format … so you don't have to think!” Based on her humorous-yet-informative Houston Chronicle calendar, The Guide details what gardeners should be doing in the garden each month, provides garden designs (using the hardiest plants for our climate) for butterflies, hummingbirds, sun, shade and a variety of other typical suburban situations. Filled with funny and touching anecdotes from
decades of covering gardening in the Greater Houston/Galveston area. As the daughter of a BOI, many of these involve Galveston sites and people!

• GARDENING WITH DOGS. Co-authored with Frances Burke Goodman, this little booklet offers tips, landscape plans, good plants for dog-challenged areas and lots of fun insights into why dogs do what they do (and how you might just unknowingly be encouraging “bad” behaviors!)

Look for all these River Bend Company books at your neighborhood nursery this fall or online at www.urbanharvest.com. For a list of potential retail sources, to order by email or to receive an order form, contact River Bend Company at 713-621-3468 or email: RiverBendBook@aol.com.


 

HomeCommunity News BusinessForumObituariesFaith

                  Brenda's Garden  DiversionsVictor LangPast Stories Links
 

Send us Email   Guidry News Service,  926 Broadway, Galveston, Texas 77550,  (409) 763 NEWS (763-6397)
© 2003, Guidry News Service.   Duplication of any part of this website in any manner is prohibited.