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Weather
Harris County Flood Control District
News Release
Monday, August 28, 2017

FLOODING ONGOING ON SAN JACINTO RIVER; RECORDS TO MAY REACH 1994 LEVELS

Record and near-record rainfall this weekend in conjunction with Hurricane Harvey has led to unprecedented watershed rises across Harris County. Waterways are still running high throughout north Harris County; and neighborhoods and roads along the San Jacinto River basin are flooding. These conditions are expected to continue throughout week.

Major flooding continues across the entire basin that is likely equal or approaching 1994 levels. Water levels will remain well above flood levels for much of this week. Residents living around Lake Houston and East/West Fork San Jacinto River should take precautionary actions to protect themselves and belongings. An update by river segments:

San Jacinto River in Montgomery County: The San Jacinto River Authority is releasing water from Lake Conroe. Lake level rises are monitored and increases are made when necessary.

West Fork San Jacinto River: Water from Lake Conroe flows into the West Fork of the San Jacinto River south to a point where it joins with Cypress and Spring creeks near U.S. 59. The West Fork flows east from there to Lake Houston. Major flooding continues on the West Fork from upstream of US 59 to Lake Houston. The river will approach record levels Tuesday morning. While Lake Conroe is currently releasing water, it is only a small fraction of the inflow into the West Fork of the San Jacinto River. The majority of the water is currently draining from Spring Creek, Cypress Creek, and Lake Creek and not Lake Conroe releases.

East Fork San Jacinto River at FM 1485: The East Fork of the San Jacinto River flows south from San Jacinto County near Cleveland. This part of the river is likely equal to the 1994 floods. Significant flooding continues along this stretch with several feet of water.

San Jacinto River below Lake Houston: The San Jacinto River flows into Lake Houston. Water goes over the top of the spillway south into the lower part of the San Jacinto River. Major flooding is ongoing in the lower part of the San Jacinto River. The river will reach major levels at 2-feet below the 1994 levels.

San Jacinto River at Sheldon/US 90: The San Jacinto River at Sheldon/US 90 is experiencing significant flooding as water flows downstream through Lake Houston. The river will reach major levels at 1-foot over the record.

About the Harris County Flood Control District

The Harris County Flood Control District provides flood damage reduction projects that work, with appropriate regard for community and natural values. With more than 1,500 bayous and creeks totaling approximately 2,500 miles in length, the Flood Control District accomplishes its mission by devising flood damage reduction plans, implementing the plans and maintaining the infrastructure. To learn more about the Flood Control District, visit www.hcfcd.org.




Remembering Jim Guidry


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